A major decrease in viral acute gastroenteritis in hospitalized Finnish children as rotavirus returns as the most detected pathogen

Oskari Pitkänen, Jukka Markkula, Maria Hemming-Harlo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: This study was performed to assess the prevalence and circulating genotypes of rotavirus, norovirus, and sapovirus in children. The results were compared to those of previous surveillance studies covering the years 2006–2008, 2009–2011, and 2012–2014 with similar methodology and setting, encompassing the start of universal vaccination with RotaTeq in 2009. Methods: Stool samples were collected from children aged <16 years with acute gastroenteritis at Tampere University Hospital, Finland, from January 1, 2017 to December 31, 2018. The samples were analysed using reverse transcription PCR and positive amplicons were sequenced. Results: A total of 178 stool samples were collected from 214 children. Rotavirus was detected in 56 (32%) stool samples, norovirus in 48 (27%), and sapovirus in 11 (6.3%). Rotavirus G9P[8] and G12P[8] were the most detected genotypes in vaccinated and unvaccinated children. GII.4 comprised 96% of the norovirus detections. Conclusions: The prevalence of all-cause acute gastroenteritis in a hospital setting decreased by 51% compared to 2012–2014, and by 88% compared to 2006–2008. Rotavirus returned as the most common cause of viral acute gastroenteritis in children, but the prevalence remains at a low level. No considerable changes were seen in the genotyping results of norovirus and sapovirus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)273-278
Number of pages6
JournalINTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES
Volume114
Early online date11 Nov 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2022
Publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • Communicable diseases
  • Diarrhoea
  • Norovirus
  • Sapovirus

Publication forum classification

  • Publication forum level 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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