Artisans of Religion at the Moral Frontiers: Finnish Soldiers’ Religious Practices, Beliefs, and Attitudes in World War II

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The chapter studies the role of religion in Finnish soldiers’ everyday life during World War II. How did the soldiers engage with religious practices and beliefs in order to make sense of their experiences in the violent frontline conditions and what kind of religious attitudes did the soldiers have? Kivimäki analyzes the experiences of frontline fatalism, soldiers’ practices of constructing protective identities in a morally threatening environment, and finally the work of Lutheran military chaplains among the troops. The analysis reveals both similarities to other cultures of war and soldiering as well as specifically Finnish and Lutheran features. With the concept of religious artisanship, Kivimäki refers to soldiers’ active role in performing and doing religion at the frontlines.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHistories of Experience in the World of Lived Religion
EditorsSari Katajala-Peltomaa, Raisa Maria Toivo
Place of PublicationCham
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages269–297
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-030-92140-8
ISBN (Print)978-3-030-92139-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022
Publication typeA3 Part of a book or another research book

Publication series

NamePalgrave Studies in the History of Experience
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
ISSN (Print)2524-8960
ISSN (Electronic)2524-8979

Keywords

  • death
  • fatalism
  • identity
  • Lutheranism
  • military chaplains
  • World War II
  • soldiers
  • Finland

Publication forum classification

  • Publication forum level 3

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