Associations of parental physical activity trajectories with offspring's physical activity patterns from childhood to middle adulthood: The Young Finns Study

Xiaolin Yang, Tuomas Kukko, Kaisa Kaseva, Stuart J.H. Biddle, Suvi P. Rovio, Katja Pahkala, Janne Kulmala, Harto Hakonen, Mirja Hirvensalo, Nina Hutri-Kähönen, Olli T. Raitakari, Tuija H. Tammelin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

We investigated the association of parental physical activity (PA) trajectories with offspring's youth and adult PA. Self-reported PA data were extracted from the Young Finns Study with three follow-ups for parents between 1980 and 1986 and nine follow-ups for their offspring in youth between 1980 and 2011 (aged 9-39 years, n = 2402) and in adulthood in 2018. Accelerometer-derived PA was quantified in 2018-2020 (aged 43-58 years, n = 1134). Data were analyzed using mixture models and conducted in 2022. We identified three trajectories for fathers and mothers (high-stable activity, 20.2%/16.6%; moderate-stable activity, 50.5%/49.6%; and low-stable activity, 29.4%/33.7%) and four for youth male and female offspring (persistently active, 13.4%/5.1%; increasingly active, 32.1%/43.1%; decreasingly active, 14.4%/12.6%; and persistently low-active, 40.1%/39.1%). Compared to low-stable active parents, high-stable active fathers had a higher probability of having their sons and daughters classified as persistently active, increasingly active, and decreasingly active in youth (Brange = 0.50-1.79, all p < 0.008), while high- and moderate-stable active mothers had significantly increased likelihood of having their daughters classified as persistently active and decreasingly active in youth (Brange = 0.63-1.16, all p < 0.009). Fathers' and mothers' high-stable activity was associated with higher self-reported PA of adult offspring than parental low-stable activity. Persistently active and increasingly active offspring in youth accumulated more adult total PA, moderate-to-vigorous PA, step counts, and self-reported PA than persistently low-active ones (all p < 0.036). Parental persistent PA, particularly paternal persistent PA, predicts offspring's PA concurrently and prospectively. Increasing and maintaining PA in youth predicts higher PA levels in midlife.

Original languageEnglish
Article number107211
Number of pages8
JournalPREVENTIVE MEDICINE
Volume163
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2022
Publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • Accelerometer
  • Offspring
  • Parents
  • Physical activity
  • Trajectory

Publication forum classification

  • Publication forum level 2

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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