Divided Nation on Records: The Transnational Formation of Finnish Popular Music During the Gramophone Fever

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterScientificpeer-review

3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Tikka and Suodenjoki explore how imported gramophone records shaped the idea of Finnish popular music and thereby fed the experiences of the nation among Finnish consumers in the late 1920s. They focus on Finnish-American records, which were imported to Finland by transnational agents during the so-called gramophone fever. As these records reached consumers, they tapped into experience communities that were based on the deep political divides of the newly independent nation-state, which had witnessed a Civil War in 1918. In a very short period of time, modern popular music, played and danced to in homes and public spaces, became a key means by which people lived out the nation and its class-based demarcations in their everyday practices.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLived Nation as the History of Experiences and Emotions in Finland, 1800-2000
EditorsVille Kivimäki, Sami Suodenjoki, Tanja Vahtikari
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Chapter6
Pages137-161
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-030-69882-9
ISBN (Print)978-3-030-69881-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2021
Publication typeA3 Part of a book or another research book

Publication series

NamePalgrave Studies in the History of Experience
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
ISSN (Print)2524-8960
ISSN (Electronic)2524-8979

Keywords

  • gramophone records
  • popular music
  • transnational history
  • nationalism
  • communism
  • communities of experience
  • music industry
  • history of experiences

Publication forum classification

  • Publication forum level 3

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Divided Nation on Records: The Transnational Formation of Finnish Popular Music During the Gramophone Fever'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this