Healthy human CSF promotes glial differentiation of hESC-derived neural cells while retaining spontaneous activity in existing neuronal networks

Heikki Kiiski, Riikka Äänismaa, Jyrki Tenhunen, Sanna Hagman, Laura Ylä-Outinen, Antti Aho, Arvi Yli-Hankala, Stepani Bendel, Heli Skottman, Susanna Narkilahti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The possibilities of human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural cells from the basic research tool to a treatment option in regenerative medicine have been well recognized. These cells also offer an interesting tool for in vitro models of neuronal networks to be used for drug screening and neurotoxicological studies and for patient/disease specific in vitro models. Here, as aiming to develop a reductionistic in vitro human neuronal network model, we tested whether human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neural cells could be cultured in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in order to better mimic the in vivo conditions. Our results showed that CSF altered the differentiation of hESC-derived neural cells towards glial cells at the expense of neuronal differentiation. The proliferation rate was reduced in CSF cultures. However, even though the use of CSF as the culture medium altered the glial vs. neuronal differentiation rate, the pre-existing spontaneous activity of the neuronal networks persisted throughout the study. These results suggest that it is possible to develop fully human cell and culture-based environments that can further be modified for various in vitro modeling purposes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)605-612
Number of pages8
JournalBiology Open
Volume2
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • Astrocyte
  • Microelectrode array
  • Network activity
  • Neuron
  • Oligodendrocyte
  • Stem cell

Publication forum classification

  • No publication forum level

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