Long-term outcomes of laser assisted blepharoplasty for ptosis: About 104 procedures in 52 patients

Franck Marie Leclère, Justo Alcolea, Serge Mordon, Pascal Servell, Frédéric Kolb, Frank Unglaub, Mario A. Trelles

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: Eyelid ptosis or blepharoptosis is defined as an abnormal drooping of the upper eyelid when looking straight ahead. Laser-assisted blepharoplasty (LAB), first introduced by Baker in 1984, presents the following advantages: improved intraoperative haemostasis, decreased operating time and improved appearance in the immediate postoperative periods. This article reports our long-term experience with LAB in ptosis correction surgery and underlines the advantages of the technique. Methods: A total of 52 patients were treated for ptosis with LAB between 2000 and 2011. The patients had an average age of 59.5 ± 9.6 years. Etiologies were senile ptosis in 34 cases, traumatic ptosis in 9 cases and congenital ptosis in 9 cases. The ptosis was classified as mild in 24 cases, moderate in 11 cases, and severe in 17 cases. The surgical technique was similar to the one described by Baker. The laser used in our studies was the CO2 Lumenis Active with the following parameters for skin incision: ultrapulse mode, continuous emission, 3-W power (program 1). The laser was then reprogrammed (program 2) with the following parameters for resection of a skin-orbicular muscle flap: regular mode, continuous emission, 9-W power with the beam slightly defocused. Results: Early complications included oedema in 8 patients. More than 1 mm of lid asymmetry was seen in 8 patients with 6 patients under corrected and two over corrected. Two of them chose secondary surgery. Mean down time was 5.5 ± 1.7 days (2-7 days). The mean late follow-up was performed after 2-10 years (mean 6.6 ± 1.7 years). Late complications included 4 recurrences 5, 6, 6, and 8 years, respectively, after the first procedure. All but one were successfully re-operated with the same technique. Overall patient satisfaction ranked high and all but one would recommend this treatment to others. Conclusion: LAB in ptosis surgery is a safe and reproducible technique particularly appreciated by patients. The procedure allows for improved intraoperative haemostasis, decreased operating time and improved appearance in the immediate postoperative periods.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)193-199
    Number of pages7
    JournalJOURNAL OF COSMETIC AND LASER THERAPY
    Volume15
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2013
    Publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

    Keywords

    • LAB
    • Laser
    • Laser assisted blepharoplasty
    • Ptosis

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Surgery
    • Dermatology

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