Novel microfluidic structures for wireless passive temperature telemetry medical systems using radar interrogation techniques in ka-band

Sofiene Bouaziz, Franck Chebila, Anya Traille, Patrick Pons, Hervé Aubert, Manos M. Tentzeris

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    28 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We present a new miniaturized (below 1 mm3) temperature sensor based on microfluidic technology and radar passive interrogation principles, which can be easily applied for temperature telemetry for medical applications. The chipless microsystem is made up of a planar-gap capacitor with a microchannel located in between its plates. The temperature-dependent expansion/shrinkage of the water inside the microchannel modifies in a monotonic way the liquid level across the capacitor. The resulting change in the effective permittivity modifies the capacitance value in a temperature-dependent way. The first prototypes of the temperature microsensor were micromachined and integrated with an antenna, while the ambient temperature was remotely measured using frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) radar interrogation principles at 29.75 GHz. Preliminary measurement results demonstrated a 0.4 dBm/°C sensitivity over a 9°C temperature range (24°C-33°C).

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number6417945
    Pages (from-to)1706-1709
    Number of pages4
    JournalIEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters
    Volume11
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012
    Publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

    Keywords

    • Electromagnetic transduction
    • frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) radar
    • medical telemetry
    • microfluidic
    • passive and chipless sensor
    • remote sensing
    • temperature microsensor
    • wireless sensor

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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