Organic silicon compounds in biogases produced from grass silage, grass and maize in laboratory batch assays

S. Rasi, M. Seppälä, J. Rintala

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    14 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In the present study the occurrence of volatile organic silicon compounds in biogas produced from grass silage, grass and maize in laboratory batch assays was analyzed and methane potentials were determined. Inoculum from a mesophilic farm digester was used, and its effects were subtracted. Methane yields from grass silage, grass and maize were 0.38, 0.42 and 0.34 m3CH4/kg - volatile solids added (VSadd), respectively. Trimethyl silanol, hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane (D3), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) were detected from all the biogases. Higher yields of volatile organic silicon compounds in the grass (from 21.8 to 37.6 μg/kgVSadd) were detected than in grass silage or maize assays (from 14.7 to 20.4 and from 7.4 to 12.1 μg/kgVSadd, respectively). Overall, it is important to consider silicon-containing compounds also in biogases in energy crop digestion as the number of biogas plants using energy crops as feeding material increases and some biogas applications are sensitive to organic silicon compounds. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

    Translated title of the contributionOrganic silicon compounds in biogases produced from grass silage, grass and maize in laboratory batch assays
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)137-142
    Number of pages6
    JournalEnergy
    Volume52
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2013
    Publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

    Keywords

    • Anaerobic digestion
    • Biogas
    • Energy crops
    • Methane
    • Siloxanes

    Publication forum classification

    • Publication forum level 2

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • General Energy
    • Pollution

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