Storycrafting refugee children’s lives. Presenting Ali and the Long Journey to Australia

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Abstract

Refugee students may come to schools with fragmented educational histories and other exile-related stressors, but many also settle fast, enjoy school and live rather ordinary childhoods. These more positive stories are not told because they get overridden by well-meaning but counterproductive stories of victimhood. This article presents a storycrafting project with 13 primary school aged refugee children in Australia, with an aim to problematise this deficit-discourse. The outcome was the group’s “preferred narrative”, that is, a story combining fact and fiction within the dialogical process between the teller and the audiences. The story was published as a fictional book and an animated film entitled Ali and the Long Journey Australia. This article discusses this process and its outcome; how a child-led project combining fact and fiction can inform qualitative research, and how stories are welcomed by audiences which are out of reach by regular research outputs.

Original languageEnglish
JournalINTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF QUALITATIVE STUDIES IN EDUCATION
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Oct 2021
Publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • fiction
  • narrative research
  • preferred story
  • refugee students
  • Storycrafting

Publication forum classification

  • Publication forum level 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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