The self-reported stress and stressors in tram and long-haul truck drivers

Jussi Onninen, Mia Pylkkönen, Tarja Hakola, Sampsa Puttonen, Jussi Virkkala, Asko Tolvanen, Mikael Sallinen

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Abstract

Work stress may compromise professional drivers’ health and driving capacity. Differences between driver groups in terms of on-duty stress are understudied. Therefore, we examined self-reported stress (Stockholm University Stress Scale) of shift-working tram and long-haul truck drivers (n = 75) across 2–3 weeks. Furthermore, stressors were self-reported retrospectively and categorised as related to the job, driving conditions, personal, or other causes. Stress levels were generally low, but moderate to high stress (≥6) was more frequently reported among the tram drivers. Stressors related to the job (54%) and driving conditions (19% of all shifts) were frequently reported among the tram and truck drivers, respectively. Moderate to high stress was associated with categorised stressors related to the job and other causes among the tram drivers, and all categorised stressors among the truck drivers. Altogether, self-reported stress and stressors differ by driver group, but the role of shift type is less significant.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103761
JournalApplied Ergonomics
Volume102
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2022
Externally publishedYes
Publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • Driving
  • Shift work
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Engineering (miscellaneous)

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