Using gaze data in evaluating interactive visualizations

Harri Siirtola, Kari Jouko Räihä

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Evaluations have long been missing or imperfect in a publication presenting a new visualization technique, but proper evaluations are now becoming a standard. There are many reasons for the reluctance of evaluating visualization techniques, including the complexity of the task and the amount of work required. We propose a simple evaluation approach that consists of a set of tasks carried out in an experimental setting coupled with eye tracking to approximate the focus of the user's attention. In addition, we discuss three methods to visualize the gaze data to gain insight into the user's attention distribution, and show examples from a study where a parallel coordinate browser was evaluated.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationHuman Aspects of Visualization - Second IFIP WG 13.7 Workshop on Human-Computer Interaction and Visualization, HCIV (INTERACT) 2009, Revised Selected Papers
    EditorsEbert Achim
    Pages127-141
    Number of pages15
    Volume6431 LNCS
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011
    Publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
    Event2nd IFIP WG 13.7 Workshop on Human-Computer Interaction and Visualization, HCIV (INTERACT) 2009 -
    Duration: 1 Jan 2011 → …

    Publication series

    NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
    Volume6431 LNCS
    ISSN (Print)1611-3349

    Conference

    Conference2nd IFIP WG 13.7 Workshop on Human-Computer Interaction and Visualization, HCIV (INTERACT) 2009
    Period1/01/11 → …

    Keywords

    • evaluation
    • gaze data
    • interactive visualization

    Publication forum classification

    • No publication forum level

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